Disease Prevention & Control

Infectious Diseases & Outbreaks

Use of intravenous drugs significantly increases the risk of contracting hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV. Northern Kentucky has seen dramatic increases in hepatitis B and C case rates, with many cases being associated with IV drug use.

Infectious Disease Manual

This manual is a resource for Northern Kentucky child care provides on issues related to communicable diseases.
While much of the information is targeted towards the child care provider, the manual can be useful to the general public.

The manual was first created in 2005, and was last updated in April 2015.

Preventing Disease Spread – PDF

  • Contributing Factors
  • Universal Precautions
  • Hand Washing
  • Animals/Wading Pools

Sanitation Guidelines – PDF

  • Cleaning and Sanitizing/Disinfecting
  • Diapering

Exclusion Guidelines – PDF

Disease Reporting and Outbreak Management – PDF

Disease Fact Sheets – PDF

Other Resources – PDF

Information on health, safety and nutrition concerns in child care settings

References – PDF

Glossary – PDF

More information

For more information about infectious diseases:
In child care settings: Contact the Health Department’s Child Care Health Consultant Susan Guthier Susan.Guthier@nkyhealth.org or 859-363-2090.

In other settings: Contact the Health Department’s Epidemiology staff at 859-363-2070.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease. It can be result in a mild illness that lasts several weeks (acute hepatitis B) or a serious, lifelong illness (chronic hepatitis B). It is preventable through a vaccine.

Learn more about hepatitis B.

In 2015, there were 22 cases of acute hepatitis B in Northern Kentucky, a rate of 5.37 per 100,000 population. In comparison, the state case rate is 3.7 per 100,000 and the national rate is 1.1 per 100,000 (state and national rates are based on preliminary numbers). Local cases of hepatitis B doubled from 2006 to 2013, and 50% of those with hepatitis B who were contacted by the Health Department admitted to IV drug use as a risk factor for the infection.

Flu

Activity

To track how flu is circulating in the community, the Health Department monitors flu cases from October to May each year. Cases are reported from local health care providers and hospitals. Flu monitoring for the 2021-2022 season began on Oct. 1.

During the 2020-2021 flu season, a total of 93 cases of flu were reported in Northern Kentucky.

See Full Page HERE

Hepatitis C

What is hepatitis C?

Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Hepatitis C can range from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness. It can be described as “acute,” meaning a new infection, or “chronic,” meaning lifelong infection.

HCV is spread by contact with infected blood. Today, most people become infected with HCV by sharing needles or other equipment to prepare or inject drugs. People born from 1945–1965, sometimes referred to as “baby boomers,” are also at risk.

Many people with hepatitis C do not have symptoms and do not know they are infected. If symptoms do occur, they could include fatigue, fever, nausea, decreased appetite, muscle or joint pain, dark urine, grey-colored stool, and yellow skin and eyes.

Hepatitis C can cause serious liver damage, including cirrhosis and liver cancer. It is the number one reason for liver transplants in the United States. Liver damage from hepatitis C can be prevented by early diagnosis and timely access to care and treatment. Unlike hepatitis A and B, there is no vaccine to prevent hepatitis C; however, hepatitis C can be cured and treated!

Testing and treatment for hepatitis C

NKY Health has a new program that provides free testing, as well as referrals for those who need treatment. For a free hepatitis C test, call to make an appointment at your county health center.

Schedule your hepatitis C test online*

To schedule an appointment at the Boone County Health Center, please request an appointment here.

To schedule an appointment at the Kenton County Health Center, please request an appointment here.

To schedule an appointment at the Campbell County Health Center, please request an appointment here.

*Testing appointments are available on Mondays between the hours of 8 am and 12 pm only.

If you learn that you are infected with hepatitis C, it is important that you receive proper medical care. A health care provider can monitor your liver disease. They can also give you advice on how to take care of your liver and information on hepatitis C treatments. Hepatitis C is curable in many cases. Medications currently available for the treatment of hepatitis C are more successful, have fewer side effects and the length of treatment is shorter (8-12 weeks).

For more information, please email nkywebmaster@nkyhealth.org.

Additional Resources

Linkage to Care – Hepatitis C Patient Resource Guide

Provider Resource for Hepatitis C Education Guide

For more information on hepatitis C, visit https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hcv/

Benefind allows Kentucky’s families to easily access public assistance benefits and information 24/7 through an online application and account. For more information, visit: https://benefind.ky.gov/

For information on signing up for health insurance, visit the Kentucky Health Benefit Exchange at https://kyhbe.ky.gov/general/agentorassister

For local help, including one-on-one meetings, to sign up for medical benefits, contact the Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission (NKCAC). The website is https://www.nkcac.org/

For resources on substance use treatment, visit findhelpnowky.org, or call the NKY Addiction Helpline at 859-415-9280.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis, or TB, is an illness caused by bacteria. It usually infects the lungs. If not treated properly, TB can be fatal.

Learn more about TB.

Testing

TB skin tests are available by appointment at the county health centers. Please call the center most convenient for you to schedule an appointment.

Please note that the Health Department’s fees for TB testing may be higher than other providers. If you are required to have the test for job or volunteer position, please check that the agency that you will be volunteering or working with doesn’t offer TB skin tests for free or at a reduced rate.

Testing can also be done through St. Elizabeth Healthcare’s business health office at 859-301-2999 or at retail health clinics inside local grocery stores and pharmacies.

Reporting a case

Active or symptomatic TB disease is reportable in Kentucky.   To report a case, please call 859-363-2120. Healthcare providers, please fax 859-363-2057.

Services for those with TB

Health Department staff provide the following services to individuals with TB who live in or are visiting Northern Kentucky:

  • Case management
  • Case investigation
  • Treatment
  • Medication assistance

For more information, please call 859-363-2120.

West Nile Virus

West Nile can be a serious threat to human and animal health. The most serious effect of West Nile is fatal encephalitis, which is an inflammation of the brain, in humans and horses. West Nile also kills certain species of domestic and wild birds.

Learn more about West Nile virus, including symptoms and transmission

Prevention

The best way to prevent infection with the West Nile Virus is to prevent mosquito bites. – see above

West Nile response

Testing Mosquitoes
Testing over the last several years has confirmed the presence of the virus in our region each year, thus it is safe to assume that local mosquitoes could carry the virus.

Humans
Individuals who may have contracted West Nile virus can be tested through local health care providers.

Case reporting
Human cases of West Nile virus are required to be investigated by the Health Department. West Nile virus is a reportable disease in Kentucky.

Mosquito control

In some instances, the Health Department may be able to implement measures to control the mosquito population in certain areas. If you have a concern about mosquito infestations in Boone, Campbell, Grant or Kenton Counties, please file a public health complaint.

More information

COVID-19 Guidance/Recommendations

For the latest numbers on COVID-19 testing and cases in Kentucky, please visit https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19.

COVID-19 Data Dashboard

Beginning March 14, 2022, NKY Health will display COVID-19 data on a weekly schedule instead of a daily update. This is to coordinate with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH) transition to the new “COVID-19 Community Level” model for data reporting which is also reported weekly. NKY Health will use this tool to help keep Northern Kentuckians informed of the COVID-19 levels and immunization rates in their communities. We will continue to closely monitor COVID-19 data and provide weekly updates on our website. We appreciate your partnership in working to keep Northern Kentuckians safe.
For more information on weekly case numbers for Kentucky counties as reported by the Kentucky Department for Public Health, please visit KDPH’s website: https://govstatus.egov.com/ky-covid-data-dashboard.
For more information on the CDC’s COVID-19 Community Level tool, please visit the CDC website: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/your-health/covid-by-county.html.

 

 

COVID-19 case data is updated weekly from the state database (CTT).

DISCLAIMER: Data on this page may not match data released by the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH) or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for several reasons, including timing of data retrieval and data sources used.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) – General Information

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

To view the CDC’s information on COVID-19, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

What is a coronavirus?

There are several different types of coronavirus. Human coronaviruses typically cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory illnesses, like the common cold. Symptoms usually include runny nose, headache, cough, sore throat, fever and/or a general feeling of being unwell. Most people get infected with a coronavirus at least once in their life. 

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a type of coronavirus that was first detected in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China in December 2019. The first documented case of COVID-19 in the United States occurred on January 20, 2020, and the first case in Kentucky was recorded on March 6, 2020. 

Who is at risk for COVID-19?

At this time, individuals who are at risk for coronavirus include are those who have had close contact with an individual diagnosed with COVID-19.

According to the CDC, certain populations are at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19. These populations include:

  • Older adults
  • People who have serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, kidney disease, diabetes and lung disease.

If you are at higher risk for getting very sick with COVID-19, you should:

  • Stock up on supplies, such as food and any medications you take. Pharmacists in Kentucky can now dispense emergency refills of up to a 30-day supply of any non-controlled medication for Kentucky residents.
  • Stay away from others who are sick, limit close contact with others and wash your hands often.
  • Avoid crowds as much as possible.
  • Avoid flying or taking cruises.

What can you do to prevent getting sick?

It is highly important to remain vigilant against the spread of infectious diseases. In order to prevent getting sick, the following is recommended:

  • Get fully vaccinated for COVID-19, including additional doses and boosters as recommended.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a face mask or cloth face covering anytime you leave your home.
  • Stay at least six feet away from others when you shop, pick up food or do errands.
  • Be alert for symptoms of COVID-19 and talk with your doctor if you or a family member develops symptoms.
  • Stay home when you feel sick.
  • Wash hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, mouth and nose with unwashed hands.
  • Properly cover your sneeze and cough with a tissue, then throw away the used tissue.
  • Frequently disinfect objects and surfaces with a cleaner that you typically use.
  • Avoid close contact with those who are sick.

High-Risk Populations

Certain populations have been identified as being at higher risk for getting very sick from Coronavirus
Disease 2019 (COVID-19). This includes:

  • Persons of ANY AGE with certain underlying medical conditions, such as chronic kidney disease,
    COPD, immunocompromised from solid organ transplant, obesity, serious heart conditions, sickle
    cell disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus.
  • Children who are medically fragile
  • Women who are pregnant and those with other medical conditions may be at an increased risk for
    severe illness
  • Senior citizens

What is social distancing?

Social distancing is one of the tools we have to prevent the spread of illness, such as COVID-19. It means limiting our activities to only what is essential and putting space between us and others. The Governor’s Office and the Ky. Department for Public Health have issued guidance and orders to promote social distancing, as well as promote safe reopening of the economy. More details can be found here: www.kycovid19.ky.gov.

What should you do if you think you may have COVID-19?

If you have had close contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19, monitor for symptoms such as fever, cough and/or difficulty breathing. If you develop symptoms, avoid contact with others, and call your doctor or healthcare provider. Tell them about your symptoms and recent travel history. They will provide you further instruction. Do NOT travel if you are sick. 

How is NKY Health addressing COVID-19?

NKY Health has been actively responding to the COVID-19 crisis in Northern Kentucky since March 2020. We continue to provide guidance and collaborate with local officials, health care providers, first responders, schools, businesses, social service agencies, and others, as well as respond to a high volume of questions from the public. All four of NKY Health’s county health centers offer COVID-19 vaccinations and booster doses.

Dealing with Anxiety About COVID-19

  • Stay informed with reliable sources, but don’t overwhelm yourself – limit yourself on how much news you read/hear.
  • Take a break from social media about COVID-19, especially the rumors and misinformation.
  • Try to keep routines in your lives as much as possible.
  • Take care of yourself, and stay healthy. Take your medication, eat a healthy diet and exercise.
  • Make sure you are getting enough sleep.
  • Find ways to relieve your stress. Take up a new hobby, and find enjoyable activities to help you relax.
  • Maintain social distancing, but at the same time maintain social connectedness. Connect virtually with friends and families.

How to Help Children Dealing with Anxiety About COVID-19:

  • Take care of yourself first.
  • Provide an open, calm and reassuring environment.
  • Make sure children feel comfortable enough to ask questions. Answer calmly, and model behaviors to them to stay safe – hand washing, hygiene, etc.
  • Provide quality information. Don’t mislead or lie to children.
  • Provide routines for children.
  • Limit children’s social media time.
  • If they don’t want to talk about COVID-19 or how they’re feeling, don’t force them.
  • While maintaining social distance, have children interact electronically with friends.

Downloads and Resources

For more information on COVID-19, please visit

www.kycovid19.ky.gov

https://www.fema.gov/coronavirus 

https://www.fema.gov/coronavirus-rumor-control

You can also call Kentucky’s COVID-19 hotline at 1-800-722-5725.

COVID-19 Testing

For the latest numbers on COVID-19 testing and cases in Kentucky, please visit https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19. Information is updated daily.

At-Home COVID-19 Test Kits

Get free at-⁠home COVID-⁠19 tests!
Every home in the U.S. is eligible to order free at-⁠home COVID-⁠19 tests. The tests are completely free. Orders will usually ship in 7-12 days. Order your tests now so you have them when you need them. Each household may place up to three orders. More info at https://www.covidtests.gov/

 

Testing is critically important to help reduce the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. If you have symptoms or had a known exposure to someone with suspected or confirmed COVID-19, you should be tested, regardless of your vaccination status. You may also consider self-testing to screen for COVID-19 immediately before an activity to see if you are positive for COVID-19. You should isolate if you test positive.

If you need to be tested for COVID-19, consider using a self-test that can be performed at home or anywhere else. Sometimes a self-test is also called a “home test”, an “at-home test”, or an “over-the-counter (OTC) test.” Visit FDA’s website for a list of authorized tests. Some self-tests may have age limitations.

Self-testing offers fast results. Self-tests are one of several options for testing for the virus that causes COVID-19 and may be more convenient than laboratory-based tests and point-of-care tests. Consider keeping self-tests at home or where you may need them.

Self-tests can also be used as one of many risk-reduction measures, along with vaccination, masking, and physical distancing, that protect you and others by reducing the chance of viral transmission. You can self-test, even if you don’t have symptoms or are fully vaccinated, in order to make decisions that will help prevent spreading COVID-19 to others.

At this time, NKY Health does not have in-home COVID-19 tests available for distribution. If this changes, we will notify the public through our website and social media.

Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nkyhealth

Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/nkyhealth

Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nkyhealthdept/

At-home COVID-19 tests are available to purchase locally at Walmart, Walgreens, CVS, Rite Aid and Sam’s Club.

For more information, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/testing/self-testing.html

COVID-19 Testing in Northern Kentucky

Please note that NKY Health does not have access to any testing provider’s scheduling platform. If you have questions about scheduling a test, please contact the provider directly. 

Testing providers include:

If you are ill or experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, please seek medical attention from your primary care provider.

 

COVID-19 Testing in Hamilton County

Free: https://healthcollab.org/testandprotect/ Health Collaborative listing

COVID-19 Drive-Thru Testing at Walgreens Pharmacy · Appointment required

  • 3 W Corry St · (513) 751-3444
  • 9 W Mitchell Ave · (800) 925-4733
  • 4241 Glenway Ave · (513) 921-7722
  • 2320 Boudinot Ave · (800) 925-4733
  • 1220 Madison Ave, Covington, KY · (859) 491-9883

CVS Pharmacy Pharmacy Appointment required

  • 5813 Colerain Ave · (513) 741-8870
  • 8560 Winton Rd · (513) 931-9359
  • Mt Healthy, OH · (513) 729-1630
  • 8372 Vine St · (513) 821-7206
  • 9197 Reading Rd · (513) 733-8550
  • 7314 Montgomery Rd · (513) 686-7771

CareFirst Urgent Care – Delhi Urgent care center · 4900 Delhi Ave · (513) 834-9320 Appointment not required

The Little Clinic, Walk-in clinic · 1 W Corry St · In Kroger · (513) 872-1530 Appointment required

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave · (513) 636-4200 Appointment required

TriHealth Priority Urgent care center · 6139 Glenway Ave · In Western Village · (513) 346-3399 Appointment required

The Little Clinic, Walk-in clinic · 5080 Delhi Pike · In Kroger · (513) 347-1925 Appointment required

Additional Resources

I Tested Positive for COVID-19

Have you been exposed to or tested positive for COVID-19?

UPDATED: 8/5/2022

General guidance for those who have been exposed to or tested positive for COVID-19. 

Downloads:
English
Spanish

 


COVID-19 Patient Guidance

 

UPDATED: 8/5/2022

Directions for what you must do if you’ve been diagnosed with COVID-19 but do not require hospitalization.

Downloads:
English
Spanish


 

Caring for Someone with COVID-19 at Home

UPDATED: 1/27/2022

Care at home can help stop the spread of COVID-19 and help protect people who are at risk of getting seriously ill.

Download:
English
Spanish

 


 

Additional Resources

I Was Exposed to COVID-19

Close Contact COVID-19 Exposure Information

General guidance for those who have been exposed to or tested positive for COVID-19. NOTE: This guidance for shortened isolation or quarantine should not apply to high-risk or congregate settings, K-12 schools, or childcare settings.

Downloads:
English
Spanish

 


Caring for Someone with COVID-19 at Home

UPDATED: 1/27/2022

Care at home can help stop the spread of COVID-19 and help protect people who are at risk of getting seriously ill.

Download:
English
Spanish

 


Exposed Guidance – What to do if you were exposed to COVID-19

UPDATED: 8/5/2022

Download
English
Spanish

 


 

Additional Resources

K-12 School/Early Care/Child Care Guidance

Reporting A Case

If you are an Early Care/Child Care Provider and need to report employees and/or students who have been diagnosed with or tested positive for COVID-19: https://redcap.research.cchmc.org/surveys/?s=W9H9KTR4PX.

General Guidance

As we enter the 2022-2023 school year, the COVID-19 pandemic is still affecting all those who learn, work and volunteer in our school environments. In promoting as much in-person learning time as possible, there may be risks and benefits that still must be weighed in each learning community as COVID-19 levels change over time. The purpose of this document is to provide information on prevention strategies that help protect students, teachers and staff and slow outbreaks of COVID-19 in K-12 schools based on CDC guidelines for K-12 schools and COVID-19 community level estimates developed by CDC. This guidance is intended to help school administrators and local health officials select appropriate, layered prevention strategies in their communities. SARS-CoV-2 transmission in K-12 schools is largely influenced by disease incidence in the community; therefore, learning environment strategies may need to be flexible in response to community changes. Layered prevention strategies should be implemented in response to the following factors:

  • Level of COVID-19 in the county (updated weekly).
  • Occurrence of outbreaks in the school or community.
  • COVID-19 vaccination coverage in the community and among students, teachers and staff.
  • Availability of SARS-CoV-2 testing for students, teachers and staff.
  • Social, behavioral or medical vulnerability factors that may affect the risk of transmission and
    feasibility of different prevention strategies in the school or individual classrooms.

DATED: 8/1/2022

The PDF can be viewed here.


Additional Resources

Healthy At Work/Business Guidance

    If an employee tests positive for COVID-19 or thinks they may have COVID-19, follow this guidance to keep the workplace safe.

    UPDATED: 7/28/2022

    The PDF can be viewed here.

     


    Additional Resources

    COVID-19 Vaccine Guidance and Information

    For the latest numbers on COVID-19 testing and cases in Kentucky, please visit https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19.

    Boosters are now available at all NKY Health County Health Centers for those who qualify. To schedule an appointment, please contact one of our health centers. Contact information for each health center can be found HERE.

    COVID-19 Vaccine Boosters

    For the latest numbers on COVID-19 testing and cases in Kentucky, please visit https://govstatus.egov.com/kycovid19.  

    Boosters are now available at all NKY Health County Health Centers for those who qualify. To schedule an appointment, please contact one of our health centers. Contact information for each health center can be found HERE.

     

    Scheduling an Appointment

    Please make sure you have read and understood all of the following information before scheduling an appointment:

    • You must wear a mask at your appointment and remain socially distanced from others.
    • If you are positive for COVID-19, you may be vaccinated after you are considered recovered and out of isolation/quarantine. We encourage you to talk to your healthcare provider about when you should receive the vaccine.
    • After you receive a vaccination, you must continue to follow regulations and guidance issued by the state and/or the CDC.
    • Some partners will bill insurance for an administrative fee.

    NKY Health’s Vaccine Clinics/Available Appointments

    If you have questions about an appointment scheduled at one of the NKY Health vaccine clinics, please email us at nkywebmaster@nkyhealth.org. To schedule an appointment, please contact your county’s health center.

    • Boone County Health Center 7505 Burlington Pike, Florence, KY 41042. Monday through Friday, 8:30 am – 4 pm.  Call the Boone County Health Center at 859-363-2060 to schedule an appointment.
    • Campbell County Health Center 1098 Monmouth St., Newport, KY 41071. Monday through Friday, 8:30 am – 4 pm.  Call the Campbell County Health Center at 859-431-1704 to schedule an appointment.
    • Grant County Health Center  234 Barnes Road, Williamstown, KY  41097. Monday through Friday, 8:30 am – 4 pm.  Call the Grant County Health Center at 859-824-5074 to schedule an appointment.
    • Kenton County Health Center 2002 Madison Ave., Covington, KY 41014. Monday through Friday, 8:30 am – 4 pm.  Call the Kenton County Health Center at 859-431-3345 to schedule an appointment.

    Additional Vaccine Providers

    If you have questions or need to cancel, confirm or reschedule an appointment with any of the vaccine providers listed on this page, please contact the provider directly. NKY Health cannot confirm, schedule, cancel or change appointments with other providers and we are unable to answer questions on their behalf.

    St. Elizabeth COVID-19 Vaccinations:

    COVID-19 vaccine appointments are available at SEP primary care practices, pediatric or family medicine offices. Patients can also receive a COVID-19 vaccine during their regularly scheduled appointments. Appointments for a subsequent dose will be made before leaving the office or can be scheduled via MyChart.

    For more information, please visit the St. Elizabeth COVID-19 Vaccine website.

    COVID Vaccine Finder

    To view vaccine appointments in your area, please visit VaccineFinder.org

    Additional Resources

    COVID-19 Vaccine Card Replacement Requests
    Have you lost or misplaced the card you were given when you received your COVID-19 vaccine?
    The COVID-19 card you received is issued by the CDC and is considered your COVID-19 shot record. It cannot be replaced with another card. However, proof of vaccination may be printed from your immunization records from the Kentucky Immunization Registry (KYIR).

    Kentucky Immunization Registry (KYIR) Public Portal​​

    ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Access your or your minor’s official immunization record through the secure Kentucky Immunization Registry (KYIR) Public Portal, a free service of the Kentucky Department for Public Health that allows individuals, parents and legal guardians to access official immunization records from KYIR.

    The portal enables residents to access, save and share their vaccination records from KYIR, a web-based system health care providers use to report vaccines they administer.

    Portal users may choose to receive a .pdf copy of their complete records, school certificates for students younger than 18, just their COVID-19 vaccine record as a .pdf file or SMART Health Card, a digital copy of your COVID-19 vaccine record that can be stored on your phone as a QR code.

    How to Access Records from KYIR

    Visit KYIR Public Portal and follow the steps below to access your immunization record. You will be asked to enter information about yourself or your child to view and download/print records.

    To access your COVID-19 QR code online, download your COVID-19 Record from the KYIR Public Portal.

    Step-by-Step Videos

    Click the links below to view a video with step-by-step instructions.

    Public Portal Overview

    Click the links below to view a step-by-step guidance document.

    Step-by-Step Instructions

    1. Go to KYIR Public Portal (you must be using Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, or Mozilla Firefox).
    2. Enter your or your child’s name, date of birth (MM/DD/YYYY) and gender.
    3. Select your relationship to the patient whose record you are accessing. Note: Parents cannot search and access their adult (18+) child’s record.
    4. Indicate how you would like to receive a code to access the immunization record (either mobile phone or email), then enter the phone number or email you or the patient used when registering for the vaccination.
    5. Click Search to locate the record. Note: A search result will only appear if there is an exact match in KYIR of the name, date of birth and cell phone or email used at registration for the vaccine.
    6. To view, save or print your full immunization record, click Download Full Record on the top right corner of the screen.

    To view, save or print your COVID-19 Record and QR code, click Download COVID-19 Record.

    To view your COVID-19 QR code, click View COVID-19 QR Code. If you are viewing this on an iPhone with iOS 15.1 or later, you will see a button to add the record to your Apple Health app and Apple Wallet app.

    Note: If you are downloading your COVID-19 Record on a mobile phone, the record with your QR code will appear in a new browser tab. If you are downloading your COVID-19 Record on a desktop, the record with your QR code will appear as a PDF.

    • Some Internet browser configurations may cause PDFs generated in KYIR Public Portal to download and not display immediately. If your immunization record does not display, check the download folder on your device for the downloaded file. Chrome and Firefox are recommended when using KYIR Public Portal.
    • It is important that the immunization record you download from KYIR Public Portal is saved securely on your personal/private device and if you print your immunization record, please store it in a safe place.

    Download PDF here.

    ​​​​​GO TO THE KYIR PUBLIC PORT​AL

    For more information please visit https://chfs.ky.gov/agencies/dph/dehp/idb/Pages/kyirportal.aspx

    COVID-19 Vaccination Schedules | CDC
    COVID-19 Vaccines for Children and Teens

    COVID-19 cases in children can result in hospitalizations, deaths, MIS-C (inflammatory syndromes) and long-term complications, such as “long COVID,” in which symptoms can linger for months. The spread of the Delta variant resulted in a surge of COVID-19 cases in children throughout the summer. During a 6-week period in late June to mid-August 2021, COVID-19 hospitalizations among children and adolescents increased fivefold. Vaccination, along with other preventative measures, can protect children from COVID-19 using the safe and effective vaccines already recommended for use in adolescents and adults in the United States. Similar to what was seen in adult vaccine trials, vaccination was nearly 91 percent effective in preventing COVID-19 among children aged 5-11 years. In clinical trials, vaccine side effects were mild, self-limiting, and similar to those seen in adults and with other vaccines recommended for children. The most common side effect was a sore arm.

    At this time we are encouraging parents to contact their child’s primary care provider regarding COVID-19 vaccines. NKY Health offers COVID-19 vaccinations for children ages 6 months and older. We will NOT be accepting walk-ins for COVID vaccines administered to children. Please contact your county health center to schedule an appointment.

     

    Additional Resources

    COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) & Myths

    Frequently Asked Questions about COVID-19 Vaccination

    Below are answers to commonly asked questions about COVID-19 vaccination.

     


    What if I lost my vaccination card?

    Have you lost or misplaced the card you were given when you received your COVID-19 vaccine?

    The COVID-19 card you received is issued by the CDC and is considered your COVID-19 shot record. It cannot be replaced with another card. However, proof of vaccination may be printed from your immunization records from the Kentucky Immunization Registry (KYIR).

    Kentucky Immunization Registry (KYIR) Public Portal​​

    ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Access your or your minor’s official immunization record through the secure Kentucky Immunization Registry (KYIR) Public Portal, a free service of the Kentucky Department for Public Health that allows individuals, parents and legal guardians to access official immunization records from KYIR.

    The portal enables residents to access, save and share their vaccination records from KYIR, a web-based system health care providers use to report vaccines they administer.

    Portal users may choose to receive a .pdf copy of their complete records, school certificates for students younger than 18, just their COVID-19 vaccine record as a .pdf file or SMART Health Card, a digital copy of your COVID-19 vaccine record that can be stored on your phone as a QR code.

    How to Access Records from KYIR

    Visit KYIR Public Portal and follow the steps below to access your immunization record. You will be asked to enter information about yourself or your child to view and download/print records.

    To access your COVID-19 QR code online, download your COVID-19 Record from the KYIR Public Portal.

    Step-by-Step Videos

    Click the links below to view a video with step-by-step instructions.

    Public Portal Overview

    Click the links below to view a step-by-step guidance document.

    Step-by-Step Instructions

    1. Go to KYIR Public Portal (you must be using Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, or Mozilla Firefox).
    2. Enter your or your child’s name, date of birth (MM/DD/YYYY) and gender.
    3. Select your relationship to the patient whose record you are accessing. Note: Parents cannot search and access their adult (18+) child’s record.
    4. Indicate how you would like to receive a code to access the immunization record (either mobile phone or email), then enter the phone number or email you or the patient used when registering for the vaccination.
    5. Click Search to locate the record. Note: A search result will only appear if there is an exact match in KYIR of the name, date of birth and cell phone or email used at registration for the vaccine.
    6. To view, save or print your full immunization record, click Download Full Record on the top right corner of the screen.

    To view, save or print your COVID-19 Record and QR code, click Download COVID-19 Record.

    To view your COVID-19 QR code, click View COVID-19 QR Code. If you are viewing this on an iPhone with iOS 15.1 or later, you will see a button to add the record to your Apple Health app and Apple Wallet app.

    Note: If you are downloading your COVID-19 Record on a mobile phone, the record with your QR code will appear in a new browser tab. If you are downloading your COVID-19 Record on a desktop, the record with your QR code will appear as a PDF.

    • Some Internet browser configurations may cause PDFs generated in KYIR Public Portal to download and not display immediately. If your immunization record does not display, check the download folder on your device for the downloaded file. Chrome and Firefox are recommended when using KYIR Public Portal.
    • It is important that the immunization record you download from KYIR Public Portal is saved securely on your personal/private device and if you print your immunization record, please store it in a safe place.

    Download PDF here.

    ​​​​​GO TO THE KYIR PUBLIC PORT​AL

    For more information please visit https://chfs.ky.gov/agencies/dph/dehp/idb/Pages/kyirportal.aspx


    If I have already had COVID-19 and recovered, do I still need to get vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine?

    Yes, you should be vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19. That’s because experts do not yet know how long you are protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. Even if you have already recovered from COVID-19, it is possible—although rare—that you could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 again. Studies have shown that vaccination provides a strong boost in protection in people who have recovered from COVID-19. Learn more about why getting vaccinated is a safer way to build protection than getting infected.

    If you were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, you should wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Talk to your doctor if you are unsure what treatments you received or if you have more questions about getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

    If you or your child has a history of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults or children (MIS-A or MIS-C), consider delaying vaccination until you or your child have recovered from being sick and for 90 days after the date of diagnosis of MIS-A or MIS-C. Learn more about the clinical considerations for people with a history of multisystem MIS-C or MIS-A.

    Experts are still learning more about how long vaccines protect against COVID-19. CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.

    Related pages:

     


    Is it safe for my child to get a COVID-19 vaccine?

    Yes. Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Like adults, children may have some side effects after COVID-19 vaccination. These side effects may affect their ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days. Children 6 months and older are now eligible to get vaccinated against COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccines have been used under the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history, including studies in children 6 months and older. Your child cannot get COVID-19 from any COVID-19 vaccine.

    Related page:

     


    Why should my child get vaccinated against COVID-19?

    COVID-19 vaccination can help protect your child from getting COVID-19. Although fewer children have been sick with COVID-19 compared to adults, children can be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, can get sick from COVID-19, and can spread the virus that causes COVID-19 to others. Getting your child vaccinated helps to protect your child and your family. Vaccination is now recommended for everyone 6 months and older.

    Related page:

     


    What are the ingredients in COVID-19 vaccines?

    Vaccine ingredients can vary by manufacturer. To learn more about the ingredients in authorized COVID-19 vaccines, see

     


    Do I need to wear a mask and avoid close contact with others if I am fully vaccinated?

    The current CDC guidance recommends everyone aged two and older should wear a mask while indoors, regardless of vaccination status. After you are fully vaccinated for COVID-19 you can resume many activities without wearing a mask or staying 6 feet apart, except:

    • if you are indoors in public and you are in an area of substantial or high transmission.
    • or where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules, and regulations, including local business and workplace guidance.

     


    Can I choose which COVID-19 vaccine I get?

    Yes. All currently authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective, and CDC does not recommend one vaccine over another. The most important decision is to get a COVID-19 vaccination as soon as possible. Widespread vaccination is a critical tool to help stop the pandemic.

    People should be aware that a risk of a rare condition called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) has been reported following vaccination with the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine. TTS is a serious condition that involves blood clots with low platelet counts. This problem is rare, and most reports were in women between 18 and 49 years old. For women 50 years and older and men of any age, this problem is even more rare. There are other COVID-19 vaccine options available for which this risk has not been seen (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna).

    Learn more about your COVID-19 vaccination, including how to find a vaccination location, what to expect at your appointment, and more.

    Related page:

     


    If I am pregnant, can I get a COVID-19 vaccine?

    Yes, COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for all people 6 months and older, including people who are pregnant, breastfeeding, trying to get pregnant now, or might become pregnant in the future. You might want to have a conversation with your healthcare provider about COVID-19 vaccination. While such a conversation might be helpful, it is not required before vaccination. Learn more about vaccination considerations for people who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

    If you are pregnant and have received a COVID-19 vaccine, we encourage you to enroll in v-safeCDC’s smartphone-based tool that provides personalized health check-ins after vaccination. A v-safe pregnancy registry has been established to gather information on the health of pregnant people who have received a COVID-19 vaccine.

    Related pages:

     


    How long does protection from a COVID-19 vaccine last?

    We don’t know how long protection lasts for those who are vaccinated. What we do know is that COVID-19 has caused very serious illness and death for a lot of people. If you get COVID-19, you also risk giving it to loved ones who may get very sick. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine is a safer choice.

    Experts are working to learn more about both natural immunity and vaccine-induced immunity. CDC will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available.

    Related page:

     


    How many doses of COVID-19 vaccine will I need to get?

    Initial Doses:

    The number of doses needed depends on which vaccine you receive. To get the most protection:

    • Two Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine doses should be given 3 weeks (21 days) apart.
    • Two Moderna vaccine doses should be given 1 month (28 days) apart.
    • Johnson & Johnsons Jansen (J&J/Janssen) COVID-19 vaccine requires only one dose.

    If you receive a vaccine that requires two doses, you should get your second shot as close to the recommended interval as possible. However, your second dose may be given up to 6 weeks (42 days) after the first dose, if necessary. You should not get the second dose earlier than the recommended interval.

    Booster Doses:

    Recommended: 1 Booster

    Recommended: 2 Booster

    Additional information is available on the CDC’s website https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/booster-shot.html.

    Related pages:

     


    If I have an underlying condition, can I get a COVID-19 vaccine?

    People with underlying medical conditions can receive a COVID-19 vaccine as long as they have not had an immediate or severe allergic reaction to a COVID-19 vaccine or to any of the ingredients in the vaccine. Learn more about vaccination considerations for people with underlying medical conditions. Vaccination is an important consideration for adults of any age with certain underlying medical conditions because they are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

    Related pages:

     


    Can I get vaccinated against COVID-19 while I am currently sick with COVID-19?

    No. People with COVID-19 who have symptoms should wait to be vaccinated until they have recovered from their illness and have met the criteria for discontinuing isolation; those without symptoms should also wait until they meet the criteria before getting vaccinated. This guidance also applies to people who get COVID-19 before getting their second dose of vaccine.

    Related pages:

     

     

    Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines


    How do I know which COVID-19 vaccine information sources are accurate?

    Accurate vaccine information is critical and can help stop common myths and rumors.

    It can be difficult to know which sources of information you can trust. Before considering vaccine information on the Internet, check that the information comes from a credible source and is updated on a regular basis. Learn more about finding credible vaccine information.

     

    Do COVID-19 vaccines contain microchips?

    No. COVID-19 vaccines do not contain microchips. Vaccines are developed to fight against disease and are not administered to track your movement. Vaccines work by stimulating your immune system to produce antibodies, exactly like it would if you were exposed to the disease. After getting vaccinated, you develop immunity to that disease, without having to get the disease first.

    Learn more about the ingredients in the COVID-19 vaccinations authorized for use in the United States.

    Learn more about how mRNA COVID-19 vaccines work.

    Can receiving a COVID-19 vaccine cause you to be magnetic?

    No. Receiving a COVID-19 vaccine will not make you magnetic, including at the site of vaccination which is usually your arm. COVID-19 vaccines do not contain ingredients that can produce an electromagnetic field at the site of your injection. All COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals.

    Learn more about the ingredients in the COVID-19 vaccinations authorized for use in the United States.

    Do any of the COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States shed or release any of their components?

    No. Vaccine shedding is the term used to describe the release or discharge of any of the vaccine components in or outside of the body. Vaccine shedding can only occur when a vaccine contains a weakened version of the virus. None of the vaccines authorized for use in the U.S. contain a live virus. mRNA and viral vector vaccines are the two types of currently authorized COVID-19 vaccines available.

    Learn more about mRNA and​ viral vector COVID-19 vaccines.

    Is it safe for me to get a COVID-19 vaccine if I would like to have a baby one day?

    Yes. If you are trying to become pregnant now or want to get pregnant in the future, you may get a COVID-19 vaccine when one is available to you.

    There is currently no evidence that COVID-19 vaccination causes any problems with pregnancy, including the development of the placenta. In addition, there is no evidence that female or male fertility problems are a side effect of any vaccine, including COVID-19 vaccines.

    Will a COVID-19 vaccine alter my DNA?

    No. COVID-19 vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way. Both mRNA and viral vector COVID-19 vaccines deliver instructions (genetic material) to our cells to start building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. However, the material never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept.

    Learn more about mRNA and​ viral vector COVID-19 vaccines.

    Will getting a COVID-19 vaccine cause me to test positive for COVID-19 on a viral test?

    No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection.​

    If your body develops an immune response to vaccination, which is the goal, you may test positive on some antibody tests. Antibody tests indicate you had a previous infection and that you may have some level of protection against the virus.

    Learn more about the possibility of COVID-19 illness after vaccination

    Can the CDC mandate that I get a COVID-19 vaccine?

    No. The federal government does not mandate (require) vaccination for people. Additionally, CDC does not maintain or monitor a person’s vaccination records. Whether a state or local government or employer, for example, can require or mandate COVID-19 vaccination is a matter of state or other applicable law

     

     

     

    Can a COVID-19 vaccine make me sick with COVID-19?

    No. None of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

    COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are signs that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.

    Can being near someone who received a COVID-19 vaccine affect my menstrual cycle?

    No. Your menstrual cycle cannot be affected by being near someone who received a COVID-19 vaccine.

    Many things can affect menstrual cycles, including stress, changes in your schedule, problems with sleep, and changes in diet or exercise. Infections may also affect menstrual cycles.

    General COVID-19 Vaccine Information & Resources

    For up-to-date information on Kentucky’s COVID-19 vaccination efforts, please visit https://govstatus.egov.com/ky-covid-vaccine

    Additional Information

    Dr. Saddler and Dr. Tolbert Discuss Vaccines

     

    Frequently Asked Questions

     

    General COVID-19 Vaccine Information

     

    For up-to-date information on Kentucky’s COVID-19 vaccination efforts, please visit https://govstatus.egov.com/ky-covid-vaccine

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