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Norovirus

What is Norovirus?
What are the symptoms of Norovirus?
How is Norovirus spread?
How can I keep from getting Norovirus?
If I’ve been exposed to Norovirus, how long will it take for symptoms to develop?
What treatments are available for Norovirus? How serious is the virus?
Who is at the highest risk of being infected with Norovirus?
Where can I get more information on Norovirus?

What is Norovirus?
 Noroviruses are responsible for most cases of non-bacterial gastroenteritis in humans, most commonly referred to as the stomach flu. Noroviruses are responsible for at least 50 percent of all food-borne outbreaks

What are the symptoms of Norovirus?
The symptoms of Norovirus include vomiting, watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea and occasionally a low-grade fever.
 
How is Norovirus spread?
Norovirus is highly contagious. It is transmitted primarily by consumption of contaminated food or water or by direct person-to-person spread. Most Norovirus outbreaks begin with infection of food by a food-handler immediately before its consumption.

How can I keep from getting Norovirus?Person washing hands

If I’ve been exposed to Norovirus, how long will it take for symptoms to develop?
Usually, the initial symptoms of Norovirus occur between 24 and 48 hours after exposure, but occasionally symptoms can begin as early as 12 hours after exposure.

What treatments are available for Norovirus? How serious is the virus?
There is currently no specific therapy for Noroviruses. When people are ill with vomiting and diarrhea, they should drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration. Dehydration among young children, the elderly, the sick, can be common, and it is the most serious health effect that can result from norovirus infection. In some instances, people with Norovirus must seek medical care to receive additional fluids.
 
Nororvirus symptoms usually last 12 to 60 hours.

Who is at the highest risk of being infected with Norovirus?
Generally, those in closed environments, such as nursing homes, cruise ships, schools and child care centers, are at the highest risk of being infected after the virus is introduced. The elderly and infants run the greatest risk of complications from the virus, such as severe dehydration.
 
Where can I get more information on Norovirus?
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's main Norovirus page
Information about Norovirus and people who prepare food
Call the Health Department at 859.363.2070

Source: Northern Kentucky Health Department, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention